Support Humboldt Vaccine Mandate

Support Humboldt County Vaccine Mandate

Scott Q Marcus started this petition to Eureka City Council, Humboldt Board of Supervisors, Arcata City Council, and Fortuna City Council

Point 1: We are facing the biggest health and public crisis in over 100 years. Everyone knows that. No rational person denies it.

Point 2: What we have done for the last year and a half has not stopped it. That’s not opinion; it’s fact – as published daily by the Humboldt County Department of Health.

Despite the fact that we now have a vaccine that we didn’t have last year, and that we know how to minimize the danger of COVID, we are at our highest levels of spread since the pandemic began. That’s just wrong.

Our hospitals are in danger of being overrun. Our health care workers are overworked and feel defeated and unappreciated. They face a shortage of staff and the options to bring in more are close to non-existent. Instead of being hailed as saviors and heroes, they have been treated as frontline pawns thrown into a winless war without regard for what they must face. To that point, we can’t even keep up with the demand for COVID tests due to the rampant penetration of the disease. And let’s not forget the societal, personal, and financial damage being done to individuals, organizations, and our local businesses. 

For the last 18 months, many of us have chipped in and done what we were asked to do to mitigate this rolling disaster. We took care of ourselves and we did our duty to take care of our community. We did everything requested of us. We isolated. We (double) masked. We socially distanced. We sterilized our hands and workspaces. We worked from home when possible. We avoided crowds and travel. We missed family celebrations and gatherings. And when it was finally possible, we stepped to the plate and got vaccinated, looking forward to being able to (somewhat) return to our lives, assuming that we – the general public – would cooperate for our own health as well as the public good.

Alas, that was not to be the case.

Because so many have refused to cooperate, we are now in worse shape than we were a year ago. It is not however for not trying. We cajoled them. Nothing. We offered all manner of incentives. Nothing. We set up vaccination clinics. Nothing. We tried enticing them in every way possible. Still nothing. Study after study; expert after expert; have all reported that the ONLY way to overcome this pandemic is vaccination. Period. End of story. COVID will not just “go away,” it will persist, probably even mutate into more dangerous incarnations if we don’t do something NOW.

We are bitterly disappointed, frustrated, and even angry at how this has shaken out. There is no reason for our progress to not only stop but to go backward due to the irresponsibility of so many others. It’s just plain wrong that those of us who did the right thing have to sacrifice YET AGAIN for those who could get the vaccine but have refused. Their argument is “personal choice.” We get it. They have that right, but with choice, comes responsibility.

In light of what has not worked, it’s time to change course and do something different than previously attempted. We must take a different tact; not only for the reasons listed above but also because, as good citizens, we believe it is our responsibility to help protect that small number of citizens with serious medical conditions who cannot get vaccinated or those too young to get the vaccine; both groups of which are at heightened risk should they catch the virus. 

The reality is continuing to yell at a wall won’t cause it to fall.

So, while continuing to try and convince and coerce and encourage the unvaccinated to step up, we need to change our tactics and target those who won’t do the right thing by, this time, making them sacrifice. Why should it be that those who won’t do the right thing get to drag down those who do? It’s time for a new approach; as the old approach didn’t work and there’s no reason to assume it will this time.

There is a public-health movement spreading across the U.S. and it’s time we instigated it in Humboldt County.

New York City is requiring proof of COVID-19 vaccination for people to enter indoor restaurants, gyms, and entertainment venues. New Orleans and San Francisco are imposing such rules at many businesses starting, while Los Angeles is looking into the idea. Smaller cities are doing this also: Cathedral City, CA, will require proof of vaccination, or a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours must be shown for patrons entering a restaurant and/or bar with the exception of children under age 12 or those with a medical condition. Local businesses and organizations are doing what they can. 

We understand that some don’t want to get the shot. Then, they don’t get to be with those who did. No shot? No public transportation. No shot? No restaurants. No shot? No attendance at public events. It’s really simple. Some say it’s wrong for the government to apply such rules but that’s not true. When public safety is necessary, we do what we have to do for the greater good. It’s not personal; it’s responsible.

We all want to get out again. We want to go on vacation. We want to go to the movies or theater. We want to eat at a restaurant – but we want to do it in a safer environment. Unlike some, we’re not willing to gamble with the virus — nor deny its reality.

We did what we were supposed to do to bring us back from the brink. We took care of everyone we could. Now, it’s time for others to help with the load. It’s the fair and right thing to do.

We want you to begin the process to require “proof of vaccination” for large and indoor events so those of us who are being responsible can enjoy the fruits of our actions. 

https://www.change.org/p/help-support-a-humboldt-county-vaccine-mandate

Time to drop a dime on these covidiots

Humboldt County residents are once again required to mask in indoor and at outdoor public settings regardless of vaccination status in accordance with the county masking order. Businesses and individuals who do not comply with the order can be reported.

“Violations of the health order may be reported to the authorities in the jurisdiction where the violations are alleged to have occurred,” according to an Aug. 5 press statement from Humboldt County Public Health. “Members of the public who wish to report a potential violation may call the appropriate county or city office directly.”

However, good luck getting your local MAGA sheriff or EPD goon to take action.

If you do see the unmasked covidiots anywhere near you leave the vicinity because these M-F’ers will be spewing their delta corona virus all over.

But hey, what the hell, let’s turn these a-holes in anyway:

Phone lines are set up to report idiot anti-maskers
Interested individuals can report noncompliance to the following jurisdictions:

• Arcata: 707-822-5953

• Blue Lake: 707-668-5655

• Eureka: 707-441-4203

• Fortuna: 707-725-1435

• Ferndale: 707-786-4224

• Rio Dell: 707-764-5642

• Trinidad: 707-677-0223

• Unincorporated county locations: 707-476-2429

More information on COVID-19 can be found at humboldtgov.org/2749/ Dashboard or 707-441-5000.

You can’t fix stupid, but it can still kill us

The “Freedom Angels Foundation” is leading protests in California against coronavirus lockdown measures as the virus surges to record levels throughout the state. Speaking to CBS5 during a rally outside the Santa Clara County Office, one protester said that they’d rather die than be vaccinated against the virus.

“I’m not even going to get the vaccine, you can put a bullet in my head before I’m going to do that,” the protester said, according to Newsweek.

On the Freedom Angels Foundation’s website, the group describes itself as a collection of “patriot mothers” who “won’t stand down.”

“Our arms don’t get tired, they carry core family values, they carry the generations of voices to call out when people, nations and beliefs are under oppression,” the group’s bio reads.

Last May, the group led a protest where over 2,000 demonstrators gathered in Sacramento against Gov. Gavin Newsom’s stay-at-home order.

God save us all from the covidiots!

from raw story

Hey Covidiots, even Darth Vader is wearing a mask

Right-wing Republican Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney posted a photo of former Vice President Dick Cheney sporting a face mask on Friday and took a shot at the manhood of people who refuse to wear face coverings in a seeming jab at Covidiot leader Donald Trump. Liz Cheney, the No. 3 House Republican, posted the photo of her father as lawmakers push harder for their constituents to wear face masks to limit the spread of coronavirus. Trump has been loath to wear a mask, despite the advice of public health experts. “Dick Cheney says WEAR A MASK. #realmenwearmasks,” the younger Cheney tweeted Friday along with a photo of her father wearing a mask.

Liz Cheney ✔@Liz Cheney

Dick Cheney says WEAR A MASK. #realmenwearmasks

Masks remain a sticking point for some politicians, most notably Trump, even as the number of coronavirus cases climbs past 2.4 million, according to data from the Johns Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that everyone “should wear a cloth face cover when they have to go out in public, for example to the grocery store or to pick up other necessities.”

But Trump has continued to defy health recommendations and has been reluctant to be seen wearing a mask in public. He recently told The Wall Street Journal that masks are “a double-edged sword” and also suggested that masks are being worn as a political statement, rather than a health precaution, to show disapproval of him.

Some Republican governors, such as Texas Gov. Greg Abbott and Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, have resisted mandating face masks be worn in public in their states despite new coronavirus peaks in their states. Experts say wearing a face mask or other face-covering could reduce the transmission of Covid-19 by as much as 50%.

Cheney’s comments on Friday were not her first to run counter to Trump’s decisions in combating the coronavirus. Cheney said in March that the US must address its health care crisis in order to restore the economy, as some of Trump’s allies pushed to reopen the country despite the threat of the coronavirus pandemic. “There will be no normally functioning economy if our hospitals are overwhelmed and thousands of Americans of all ages, including our doctors and nurses, lay dying because we have failed to do what’s necessary to stop the virus,” Cheney wrote on Twitter.

In April, Cheney pushed back against a false claim by Trump that he has “total” authority to decide to lift restrictions governors have imposed amid the coronavirus pandemic.”The federal government does not have absolute power,” Cheney tweeted at the time, though she did not mention Trump explicitly. The Wyoming Republican invoked the 10th Amendment to the Constitution in her tweet, saying, “‘The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.’ United States Constitution, Amendment X.”

Cheney is not alone in calling for mask-wearing. Republican Sen. Marco Rubio, whose state of Florida has seen a recent surge of coronavirus cases, said Wednesday that “everyone should just wear a damn mask.”

Presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden said Friday that if elected president, he would make wearing a face covering in public mandatory. Last month, Trump and the White House had mocked Biden for wearing a mask outdoors to a Memorial Day event, leading Biden to fire back in an interview with CNN, calling Trump “an absolute fool.”

From CNN

Humiliating Mega MAGA failure as Trump admits he ordered his people to slow down Coronavirus testing

Less than 7000 covidiots show up for Tyrant Trump’s rally

Tyrant Trump’s attempt to revive his re-election campaign sputtered badly on Saturday night as he traveled to Tulsa for his first mass rally in months and found a far smaller crowd than his aides had promised him, then delivered a disjointed speech that did not address the multiple crises facing the nation or scandals battering him in Washington.

The weakness of Trump’s drawing power and political skills, in a state that voted for him overwhelmingly and in a format that he favors, raised new questions about his electoral prospects for a second term at a time when his poll numbers were already falling. And rather than speak to the wide cross-section of Americans who say they are concerned about police violence and systemic racism, he continued to use racist language, describing the coronavirus as “Kung Flu.”

While Trump’s campaign had claimed that more than a million people had tickets for the rally, the 19,000-seat BOK Center was at least one-third empty during the rally crowd now is estimated to have been less than 7000! A second, outdoor venue was so sparsely attended that he and Mike Pence both canceled appearances there and the stage was taken down. Trump was furious about the unused outdoor stage and the comparatively thin crowd in the stadium, according to two people familiar with his reaction. News broadcasts carried video of the partially empty stadium, and even the Drudge Report, a reliably conservative website, carried an all-caps headline that said “MAGA LESS MEGA” with a picture of rows and rows of empty blue seats.

The disappointing turnout came as Trump already found himself under siege about his sudden firing of the U.S. attorney in Manhattan and his losing legal battle over the release of a memoir full of damaging revelations by John R. Bolton, his former national security adviser. And in Tulsa, Mr. Trump faced criticism for ignoring pleas from officials about health risks to rallygoers and for restarting his “Make America Great Again!” rallies in a city where a white mob massacred hundreds of black residents 99 years ago.

In rambling, grievance-filled remarks, Trump made no reference to the Tulsa massacre of 1921 or to George Floyd, whose death at the hands of a white police officer in Minneapolis last month spurred global demands for racial justice. He also did not mention Juneteenth, which marks the end of slavery in the United States and fell just a day before his rally.

Instead, the “idiot king” railed about “left-wing radicals” who he falsely claimed were rioting in cities across the country and praised police officers.

Trump once again shrugged off the threat from the coronavirus, which he also called the “Chinese virus” at one point, and bragged that he has done “a phenomenal job” fighting the pandemic. He acknowledged that increased testing for the virus revealed more cases of infection, which he felt made the country look bad.

“So I said to my people, ‘slow the testing down,’” he said.

Many of the thousands of Trump supporters at the rally did not wear masks or stand six feet apart — health precautions that Trump himself continues to ignore. Health experts remained concerned that the event could be a dangerous incubator for the virus, spreading through the building’s recirculated air.

A few hours before the event, the campaign disclosed that six Trump campaign staff members who had been working on the rally had tested positive for the coronavirus during a routine screening. Two members of the Secret Service in Tulsa also tested positive for the virus, according to people familiar with the matter. Mr. Trump, who was made aware of the sick campaign aides before departing for the rally, was incensed that the news was made public, according to two people familiar with his reaction.

While rallies are Mr. Trump’s favorite events, election-year politics has changed since his last one, on March 2. The coronavirus has largely shut down the campaign trail, and more recently the national political conversation has been dominated by a fierce debate over police violence against black Americans after the killing of Mr. Floyd. This altered political landscape has had little effect on Trump, whom advisers describe as feeling like a caged animal during the national lockdown that forced him to abandon most travel. They say he is determined to recapture the excitement of his pre-virus campaign rallies, but this one seemed unlikely to offer much relief to a whiney Donald Trump.

Trump flew to Oklahoma amid mounting questions about the firing of Geoffrey S. Berman, the U.S. attorney in Manhattan, whose office had investigated some of Trump’s closest allies, imprisoning Michael D. Cohen, his former personal lawyer, and beginning an inquiry into Rudolph W. Giuliani, his current lawyer.

On Saturday afternoon, Attorney General William P. Barr announced that Mr. Trump had personally approved Mr. Berman’s firing. But soon afterward, as Mr. Trump left the White House for the trip to Tulsa, Trump lied and said that “we have a very capable attorney general, so that’s really up to him. I’m not involved.”

The campaign had chosen to return first to Oklahoma, which Donald won by 36 points in 2016, assuming his appearance would be wildly popular there. Aides to Mr. Trump spent the week boasting about enormous interest from people in the rally, and Mr. Trump bragged on Saturday as he left for Oklahoma that “the crowds are unbelievable,” which proved false.

Some users of social media said on Saturday night that teenagers helped keep attendance at the rally down by seeking tickets they did not intend to use. TikTok and Twitter users posted that they had registered potentially hundreds of thousands of tickets for Trump’s campaign rally as a prank after @TeamTrump tweeted asking supporters to register for free tickets.

During his speech, Mr. Trump delivered a defensive, 15-minute explanation of images that showed him ambling slowly down a ramp after delivering the commencement address at the West Point military academy last weekend. He blamed his slow walk on “leather soles” on his shoes and said he was trying not to fall on his behind.

He also took several sips of water out of a glass after video at the West Point event showed him struggling to bring a glass up to his lips. He said he was trying to make sure he did not spill the water on his tie. The crowd applauded wildly.

Trump and his advisers hope the return to the campaign trail will help deflect attention from a daily stream of crises engulfing the White House. On Saturday, a federal judge refused to block the release of Mr. Bolton’s book, though he said the former national security aide may be personally liable for revealing classified information.

People close to Trump also said that the lack of regular adulation that he receives from the cheering crowds since the coronavirus lockdowns has left him morose and irritable. And his advisers had hoped that the rally would be a positive outlet for his energy, as opposed to his Twitter feed, where he has posted several self-destructive messages in the last several weeks.

Edited from a story in the New York Times

 

Donald Trump and his racist “Lost Cause”

By now it should be obvious to anyone paying attention that Donald Trump is one of the most notorious revisionists of any modern president, routinely authoring his own myths, lies and tall tales to counter the brutal reality of his incompetence, malevolence and despotism. It started from Day One, with his easily debunked insistence that his inauguration generated the largest audience in the history of audiences. His myth-making continues today with his whiny laments about his popularity backed with alleged “Democrat hoaxes” surrounding every one of his obvious crimes.

It’s no wonder, then, that Trump is a marketeer for the apocryphal “Lost Cause,” the toxic revisionist history that emerged in the decades following the Civil War and continues to flourish today. “History,” by the way, is used loosely here, given that the Lost Cause is nothing more than a series of dubiously manufactured myths — counterfactual propaganda designed to absolve southern whites of the sins that precipitated and fueled their separation from, and rebellion against, the United States in the name of preserving the right to own African slaves.

We can plainly observe the poison of the Lost Cause flowing through Trump’s blurts whenever he defends monuments to Confederate commanders, or when he defends the Confederate monikers for various U.S. Army bases. His most infamous defense of the “very fine people” who protested in support of the Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, back in 2017, was torn directly from the Lost Cause playbook.

Additionally, the police violence we’re witnessing today, along with the arguments of those who defend it, has its roots in the Lost Cause as well. Indeed, so much of the racism that currently exists, 155 years after Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, is manifested and justified by the myths of the Lost Cause.

Origins of the Lost Cause

In many ways, the Civil War was the prototype for 20th century-style warfare. The military technology that was developed immediately before and during the war vastly outpaced the archaic Napoleonic tactics used during the first several years of Civil War battles. The new rifled musket was capable of firing conical Minié ball rounds faster, farther and more accurately than the old spherical rounds, yet massed armies continued to march in long lines of battle, shoulder-to-shoulder, within close range of the other side, causing a bloodbath of unprecedented magnitude.

Photography, another relatively new technology at the time, would deliver the images of mangled casualties to the public for the first time, leaving no doubt as to the mind-blowing devastation of war. Likewise, nightmarishly awful trench warfare emerged in 1864 — a “dress rehearsal” for World War I, as historian Shelby Foote once described it — adding to the ugliness and carnage. The Victorian “picnic” at Bull Run in 1861 would quickly evolve into the apocalyptic trench combat of Spotsylvania Courthouse and Petersburg three years later.

After the war, while the task of reunifying the nation began to take shape, few observers and participants forgot about the grisly horror show that had occurred. (Contemporary historians suggest that around 750,000 men died in the war, a larger number than was understood at the time — and by far the largest body count of any war in American history.) Someone would have to pay for the carnage, Northerners commonly believed. From there, several schools of thought emerged about how best to handle reincorporating the former Confederate states back into the Union. Radical Reconstructionists wanted to punish the South, executing the perpetrators of secession and redefining the Southern way of life so that secession could never happen again. Others wanted a more moderate, or more conciliatory approach, including Abraham Lincoln and his ham-fisted (not to mention overtly racist) successor, Andrew Johnson.

While Northern politicians and Union generals engaged in shepherding the policies of Reconstruction, authors, journalists and special interest groups sympathetic to the South began work on the reunification of hearts and minds: This was what would eventually emerge as the Lost Cause, a term first coined by Southern author Edward Pollard in 1866. In other words, revisionist historians began to address the task of reunifying white people of the North and white people of the South following so much brutality, with a clear motivation to exonerate southern whites.

The myths of the Lost Cause

While Northern politicians and Union generals engaged in shepherding the policies of Reconstruction, authors, journalists and special interest groups sympathetic to the South began work on the reunification of hearts and minds: This was what would eventually emerge as the Lost Cause, a term first coined by Southern author Edward Pollard in 1866. In other words, revisionist historians began to address the task of reunifying white people of the North and white people of the South following so much brutality, with a clear motivation to exonerate southern whites.

The central thrust of the Lost Cause was to reframe the animators of secession — Southern landowners and politicians, along with the insurgents who formed the Confederate military — as having fought for the more “noble” cause of Southern states’ rights. The goal was to erase slavery as the obvious and express intention of secession, even though the preservation of slavery is clearly enumerated in the Confederate constitution.

When Donald Trump defended the names of U.S. military bases named for rebel generals, he borrowed directly from the Lost Cause mythology: “These Monumental and very Powerful Bases have become part of a Great American Heritage, and a history of Winning, Victory, and Freedom.” The Lost Cause was all about rebranding traitors and racists as having fought bravely for ideals like “heritage,” “freedom” and “nobility.”

Again, this entirely counterfactual, transforming greedy villains who were responsible for the subjugation of African Americans and the deaths of hundreds of thousands, into kinder, gentler souls who were only interested in defending their cultural heritage and the absolutist interpretation of the 10th Amendment. It’s not exactly a shock to learn that Trump and other Republican leaders subscribe to this “cultural heritage” fiction.

As bad as all that sounds, the subsequent myths of the Lost Cause are far more sinister and inexcusable.

One of the most dominant prongs of the Lost Cause was the characterization of Blacks as a common enemy of both northern and southern whites. Mythologists believed that if white people were fighting Black people, then white people wouldn’t fight each other again. The goal of smearing African Americans as the enemy of white America involved the whole-cloth fabrication of cultural myths about African Americans, emerging at the dawn of the 20th century and beyond. Architects of the mythology felt that Black people didn’t possess a cultural identity and therefore identities could be entirely invented for them by white supremacists.

Prime movers of the Lost Cause taught, therefore, that slaves actually liked being slaves, and were treated better than some whites. Likewise, the myth of Black Confederates, fighting willingly alongside their owners, emerged from similar sources. (In reality, while thousands of Black men accompanied their masters into the Confederate army, they were “camp slaves,” not soldiers. There is no reliable evidence that any Black people, free or enslaved, voluntarily fought for the rebel cause.)

Publications and, later, films would portray Black men as unpredictable thieves or as lazy and shiftless “takers,” as well as wanton rapists and subjugators of white people.

D.W. Griffith’s 1915 silent classic “Birth of a Nation” is the best known cinematic example of Lost Cause myth-making, though other silent films of the early 20th century were arguably more insulting, with titles and plots too horrendous to publish here.

The white protagonist of “Birth of a Nation,” fictional Confederate veteran Ben Cameron, invents the Ku Klux Klan to take back his southern heritage. Cameron’s KKK is portrayed as an avenging army of swashbuckling heroes who swarm to the rescue of a white woman being surrounded in her cabin by a platoon of lascivious Black soldiers. Naturally, these soldiers are played by white actors in blackface who behave in offensively stereotypical ways.

Black Union soldiers, meanwhile, are shown suppressing and intimidating white voters during Reconstruction. In one scene, several bayonet-wielding Black men disenfranchise white voters at a polling place. Black politicians, including the Silas Lynch character, are unanimously elected to the state legislature via the intimidation of white citizens at the hands of Black troops. The all-Black legislature then goes on to pass laws that strip white people of their right to vote. The politicians, meanwhile, ogle and harass white women in the street, but only when they aren’t getting drunk and eating chicken legs.

Given the pernicious vilification of Blacks during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, it’s no surprise that in the United States between 1882 and 1968, white people lynched more than 4,400 African-Americans, in large part based on racial resentments and prejudices driven by the fiction of the Lost Cause.

Similarly, the epidemic of police violence against Blacks also has its roots in the Lost Cause.

In addition to the perpetuation of racist stereotypes, these myths were heavily borrowed to justify Jim Crow laws, which were specifically designed to oppress Southern Blacks. In Douglas Blackmon’s groundbreaking 2009 book, “Slavery by Another Name,” the author documents the symbiosis between Jim Crow laws, law enforcement and “neo-slavery” that lasted well into the 1940s and beyond. Blackmon detailed how nonsense laws against things like “vagrancy” were used to supply backwoods plantations and mines with slave labor. In the Jim Crow South, cops would arrest Black men for, in one example, not carrying proof of employment, then hustle them through kangaroo courts and eventually disappear them into a new and supposedly legal form of slavery in which many African-Americans were worked to death. The practice survived until Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered the FBI to shut it down at the outset of World War II, yet forms of slave labor continue to exist within the modern prison-industrial complex today.

Blackmon’s stories of “vagrancy” arrests and the like also call to mind the atrocious “papers, please” policy enacted by Arizona’s SB 1070 law in 2010. (It was partially, but not entirely, struck down by the Supreme Court two years later.)

The Lost Cause in the modern era

The modern Republican “Southern strategy” has been all about exploiting Lost Cause myths to scare white people into voting for GOP candidates. The Reagan-era notion of “welfare queens” played up the “lazy and shiftless” stereotypes of the Lost Cause. The “makers and takers” slogan is a less overt iteration of the same thing.

The so-called “war on drugs” turned out to be just another excuse to lock up African Americans. Blacks arrested for possessing crack cocaine, for example, ended up serving longer prison sentences than whites arrested for possessing the same quantity of powder cocaine.

In 1988, Republican political strategist Lee Atwater, along with George H.W. Bush’s media consultant, future Fox News founder Roger Ailes, devised the infamous Willie Horton commercial in order to scare white people into voting against Michael Dukakis. Two years later, the late Sen. Jesse Helms of North Carolina rolled out his famous “white hands” commercial, which cautioned white people that affirmative action would allow black people to take their jobs.

The Rev. Jeremiah Wright’s “God damn America” video was exploited by Fox News and far-right media to scare white people into voting against Barack Obama, who had just about every Lost Cause trope catapulted at him throughout his two terms.

Fox News celebrities like Bill O’Reilly have routinely employed racist myths to attack the Obamas. O’Reilly once defended “the white power structure that controls America.” He also said about Michelle Obama, “I don’t want to go on a lynching party against Michelle Obama unless there’s evidence, hard facts, that say this is how the woman really feels.”

Social media memes of Barack Obama dressed as a witch doctor or the Obamas as monkeys or the Obama-era White House lawn littered with watermelons were all pure turn-of-the-century Lost Cause stereotypes.

All told, the Lost Cause has been one of the most successful disinformation campaigns in world history. Its themes continue to be intrinsic to the white misperception of post-Civil War racial history, including Trump’s “heritage” defense of military base names, his defense of Charlottesville white supremacists, and his fetish for law enforcement violence. Likewise, his routine attacks against African-American journalists (e.g., Yamiche Alcindor of PBS and Don Lemon of CNN), athletes (e.g., former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick) and lawmakers (e.g., “Low IQ” Rep. Maxine Waters) invariably echo the stereotypes of the Lost Cause.

It’s no wonder Trump is a proud student of its fiction. The Lost Cause has been so completely absorbed by the confirmation bias of white racists that its lies have become inextricably bound to conventional wisdom, printed and distributed as legitimate history for way too long. This is why it’s been so difficult to shake loose, and it’s why there’s such a powerful movement now against police violence and the continued lionizing of Confederate insurgents. It’s taken more than a century to finally begin to pull down some of the literal monuments to the Lost Cause, as well as to successfully achieve bans against the Confederate battle flag.

We’re making progress now, but how many African Americans and other people of color have been stripped of their constitutional rights along the way? How many have suffered and died as a consequence of these fictitious justifications for American racism, especially for our history of secession and slavery? The white supremacist mythmakers believed they were keeping the (white) peace after four gruesome years of war, but all they were doing was rationalizing more death — not to mention injustice — at the hands of racist vigilante groups, cops, politicians, corporations and scores of white supremacist followers, all brainwashed by these 155-year-old lies passed off as “history” and “heritage.”

 

 

Raw Story Bob Cesca, Salon – Commentary

Trump’s infectious “Covid suicide bombers” take to the streets nationwide

Trump’s armed and infectious insurgents are essentially anti-American suicide bombers.

Democratic leaders don’t typically borrow from the playbook of GOP politics, but in light of these “engineered protests,” I think they should make an exception.

With many far-right militias and wingnuts using Facebook to organize “anti-quarantine protests” at state capitols around the country. Tens of thousands have joined their Facebook group, giving the impression that a “populist libertarianism” sentiment is emerging more than opinion surveys would suggest. Just like they did with the Tea Party AstroTurf fo movement

This activity is being amplified by Trump, who is using Twitter to encourage armed resistance to state-based initiatives aimed at containing the novel coronavirus pandemic with orders to stay home. The “protests” were in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Michigan, and others swing states Donald Trump needs to win reelection.

Meanwhile, the Pew Center, which is the gold standard for measuring public opinion, released a new survey in which 66 percent of Americans fear their state governments will lift restrictions “too quickly.” Sixty-five percent said “Trump’s initial response” to the COVID-19 pandemic was “too slow.” Moreover, 73 percent said the worst is yet to come. (Implicit is the widespread doubt of Washington’s ability to face the challenge.)

Someone here represents America’s majority view, and it’s not the people ginning up outrage on social media and make-believing revolution for the benefit of television cameras on the steps of state capitol buildings. Indeed, the majority view isn’t getting the attention it deserves, because the majority is doing what it believes must be done in times of severe crisis: working together, as a nation, to combat a collective peril.

The majority view, in other words, is silent. That’s why I think Democratic leaders should invoke Richard Nixon. In 1969, he coined the term “silent majority” to claim a mandate from “middle Americans” who did not demonstrate in huge numbers against his prosecution of the Vietnam War but instead supported his wartime policies.

To be sure, “silent majority” is what fascists have said for decades when they need to contravene a rapidly changing view on, say, an overseas war going south. “Silent majority” is what a literal minority invokes to smash a literal majority in the face. Even so, Nixon’s words should resonate right now when 41,000 Americans are dead from COVID-19. “If a vocal minority, however fervent its cause, prevails over reason and the will of the majority, this nation has no future as a free society,” Nixon said. Individuals can’t be truly free. In the collective, however, can be found the meaning of freedom.

In this sense, the protesters have it backwards. They believe (or pretend to believe; more on that in a moment) that government coercion is the opposite of individual freedom. Stay-at-home orders infringe their liberty. If they want to risk getting sick—or dying—that’s their right. No government has the authority to tell them otherwise.

This thinking ignores the fact that one person’s right to liberty ends with another person’s right to security, and that all governments are charged with balancing all of those rights for everyone’s sake. (Whether a government is striking the right balance is usually reflected by the majority view.) For this reason, coercion is not the opposite of freedom during a pandemic. Coercion, at least for now, is in the service of freedom. Only when everyone is acting in everyone else’s interest can this crisis be overcome.

They say they stand for individual liberty. What they really stand for is disloyalty, disunion and death.

But let’s not give these people too much credit, shall we? As the Post reported, “protest” organizers were not acting in good faith. They were pretending to believe what they say they believe. Organizers knew unwitting participants (some of whom no doubt were acting in good faith) would get sick, or die, before spreading the disease. Death, even their own, is an acceptable consequence of meeting their political goals.

These “protest” organizers call themselves “patriots.” Fair enough. Equally fair, however, is calling them insurgents, or even domestic terrorists, willing to commit suicide by way of infecting themselves and others to destabilize public trust as well as the political union of these United States. They say they stand for liberty. They really stand for disloyalty, disunion and death. Americans invoking patriotism but disobeying stay-at-home orders do so with the moral justification of a suicide bomber.

If “protesters” risked harm to themselves only, it might be appropriate to characterize them as a kind of “death cult.” (It might be funny, in a grim way, to joke about “culling the herd.”) But these people do not only put themselves as risk. The World Health Organization warned today the pandemic has yet to peak. “Protesters,” therefore, threaten us all. As Nixon said: “If a vocal minority, however fervent its cause, prevails over reason and the will of the majority, this nation has no future as a free society.
” You are the real “silent majority.”  Don’t forget it.

 

edited from John Stoehr commentary, in Raw Story