Award for EPD at a conference in Houston because of Palco Marsh expulsion, wtf?

EPD has received an award specifically for kicking the homeless out of the Palco Marsh, which makes you really wonder who seriously misled the organization that gave out the award.

Take one look around Eureka and it’s easy to see that Ex-Police Chief Mills’ plan to kick the homeless out of PALCO marsh without a shelter, housing or another area to go to, just make the problem much worse in Eureka. The problem was bad enough at the marsh but without a viable plan and location to move people to (with the exception of the 40 people in the shipping containers), it arguably made the situation much worse,

We wonder if this organization will next be giving Trump a race-relations Award or Kim Jong Un a Human rights Award?  Thanks again Andy…………Pitiful

KIEM TV3 reports: EPD honored for efforts to address homelessness

EUREKA – Though there’s more work to be done, the Eureka Police Department and its community partners were honored for their efforts to address homelessness in the city.

The Center for Problem-Oriented Policing presented EPD, the City of Eureka and mental health providers with the 27th Herman Goldstein Award at a conference in Houston.

The award recognizes groups for innovative and effective policing. EPD was specifically highlighted for vacating the Palco Marsh and establishing the Mobile Intervention Services or MIST team.

Chief Steve Watson said dozens of people contributed to these efforts and he wants the community to continue building on that success. He added, “Even though we’re a smaller somewhat isolated community here on the North Coast, the fact that we are looking outside of our limited exposure here to modern broad based policing practices like problem oriented policing and thinking outside the box, understanding the importance of close collaboration with community partners, that it’s not all just about the police department, that you have to bring all the stakeholders together to address these kind of issues, I think that’s the key takeaway here.”

 

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Stand with the Wiyot people. Stand against racist Rob Arkley

Our own local Trump wannabe rich-guy bully Robin Arkley wants to buy Indian Island (Tuluwat) so the city cannot give it back to the Wiyot people who it was stolen from.

Arkley represents locally what we’ve seen on a national stage. Bigots and Racists coming out of the shadows embolden by Trump expressing their hatred and discrimination openly and proudly.

We have an opportunity to stand up to him in a small way by demonstrating in front of his business, Security National at the corner of 5th and E street. Tuesday afternoon between 4pm and 7pm

Background story from Hunter Cresswell Times-Standard:

Rob Arkley’s proposal to buy Indian Island has drawn criticism from members of the Wiyot and Yurok tribes, and a local protest against the sale is organized.

Arkley, during a talk radio spot earlier this week, expressed an interest in offering more than the appraised value for land on Indian Island that the city of Eureka owns and is working to transfer to the Wiyot Tribe.

“They want to give Indian Island to the Wiyots,” he said Monday on air. “Well I use Indian Island (Tuluwat). I like it; my kids do. I see people there all the time when I’m over there. I don’t get how they can take one of our assets and give it. So I’m going to be offering over the appraised value for the property.”

Indian Island is the location of the ancient villages Tuluwat and Etpidolh. For generations, tribal people held the yearly World Renewal Ceremony on Indian Island until the massacre of Wiyot men, women and children in 1860. The ceremony was held on Indian Island again in 2014 after a 154-year hiatus.

Eureka city manager Greg Sparks said the 200 acres of land the city plans to transfer to the tribe is appraised at $200,000. He said the city council hasn’t discussed taking Arkley up on the offer but the discussions about the transfer have always been about giving the island to the tribe at no cost. The city and tribe are working now to draft a final agreement, Sparks said.

Arkley didn’t respond to multiple requests for comment to clarify and expand on the statements he made on KINS News Talk Radio Talkshop with Brian Papstein. Arkley and the host were discussing challenges to establishing businesses locally including a burdensome permitting process and lacking infrastructure when Arkley brought up the proposed transfer of Indian Island.

“They’re giving it away as surplus property. Well that’s fine but at the same time that’s an asset that is gone from the public forever. The Wiyots have made no commitment to allow us to use it and the city’s giving it away. What is this city council thinking of? I mean it’s astonishing and flabbergasting to me,” he said.

Wiyot Tribal administrator Michelle Vassell in emailed statements talked about the sacredness of the island to the Wiyot People, it’s importance as a habitat in Humboldt Bay and how transferring ownership from one government to another would keep the land public.

“Discussions about this specific portion of city-owned land have been ongoing for over two years. The tribe obviously hopes the City of Eureka will continue the negotiations with the tribe in good faith and not entertain the Arkley offer,” she said.

Arkley continued on air to say the city council is determined to give this land away. The council voted unanimously in July to approve the agreement and move forward with the land transfer.

“Greg Sparks was singularly unimpressive when I met with him. He was mad at me, mad at me for saying, ‘You’re giving away an asset of the community, of future generations.’ We have the only rookery for a city in California and we’re giving it to the natives. We already gave them one thing, now we’re giving them another? I don’t know what these women on the city council are thinking. It may feel good, it certainly isn’t intellectually a bright thing to do. It’s intellectually not defensible,” Arkley said on air before moving on to other community issues.

Sparks denied that he was mad during the meeting.

“There wasn’t any issue about the city being angry about that,” he said.

Vassell said the tribe has been working to get back and restore parts of the island including 1.5 acres bought in 2000 and 40 acres the city of Eureka transferred to the tribe in 2004.

“Since the tribe’s return to the island, the tribe has been successful in restoration of the island,” she said. “The tribe has removed over 60 tons of scrap metal, and many tons of garbage; shoring up and preventing the erosion of an ancient middin (shell mound) preventing further destruction of the mound. The tribe removed tens of thousands of tons of toxins and hazardous waste from a boat repair facility that once operated on the island, removed evasive species such as spartina and planted native plants that will create and enhance wildlife habitat today and in years to come.”

Eureka resident Allen McCloskey, a member of the Yurok Tribe, also emailed in a statement about the importance of the island to the Wiyot people and the equal importance of giving it back.

“The Wiyot People, as the original inhabitants and stewards of Indian Island, have what I equate to a genetic-historical-connection to (Tuluwat) Indian Island,” he wrote. “The cultural connection of the tribe to Indian Island goes back countless generations and their people are intrinsically tied to the Island. In fact I would argue that their individual and collective well-being and prosperity and the healing of the tribe’s genetic memory with regards to the historical trauma and deliberate attack by Eureka’s great businessmen of the time, to commit genocide of the Wiyot people, is truly contingent upon the environmental health and return of this land to its original inhabitants/stewards.”

The proposed offer also drew the ire of the Tsurai Ancestral Society, which is made up of direct descendants of Yurok tribespeople who lived in the Tsurai village near what is now known as Trinidad. The society drafted a letter in support of the land transfer.

“While Mr. Arkley may feel the island (Tuluwat) belongs to him and his children, because, as he stated, they ‘like it,’ it was stolen from the Wiyots in a horrific, murderous rampage. We, as a community, should be supporting the healing of those historical wounds and trying to support the local tribes in their attempt to continue with their cultural,” the letter reads.

Local resident Johanna Johnson heard about Arkley’s statements and organized a protest of the sale on Sept. 19 at 6 p.m. in front of Security National, the holdings company Arkley is the CEO of, at 323 Fifth St., Eureka.

“I have worked with and fostered native youths in our community. I understand the urgency and significance of returning Tuluwat (Indian Island) to the Wiyot Tribe. For cultural purposes. For healing purposes. Mr. Arkley needs to understand the island is not for entertainment purposes,” she said in an email.

http://www.times-standard.com/article/NJ/20170803/NEWS/170809934

Billionaire loses bid to shut off access to public beach and surprise! It’s not Bullyboy Arkley

This guy sounds just like our own local bully Robin P. Arkley  

Silicon Valley billionaire loses bid to prevent access to public beach

Court decision is blow to Vinod Khosla and other wealthy landowners seeking to buy renowned beaches, making public land private

 Martins Beach must be opened to the public, according to a California court order.

A California court has ordered a Silicon Valley billionaire to restore access to a beloved beach that he closed off for his private use, a major victory for public lands advocates who have been fighting the venture capitalist for years.

An appeals court ruled on Thursday that Vinod Khosla, who runs the venture capital firm Khosla Ventures and co-founded the tech company Sun Microsystems, must unlock the gates to Martins Beach in northern California by his property.

The decision is a major blow to Khosla and other wealthy landowners who have increasingly tried to buy up the internationally celebrated beaches along the California coast and turn public lands into private property.

The beach was a popular destination for fishing, surfing and other recreational activities for nearly a century, and the previous owners provided a general store and public restroom. But Khosla eventually bought the property and in 2010 closed public access, putting up signs warning against trespassing.

Khosla, who has a net worth of $1.55bn and does not live on the property, has faced multiple lawsuits and legislative efforts to get him to open up the gate to the beach near Half Moon Bay, about 30 miles south of San Francisco. The law in California states that all beaches should be open to the public up to the “mean high tide line”.

The decision this week, affirming a lower court ruling, stems from a lawsuit filed by the Surfrider Foundation, a not-for-profit group that says the case could have broader implications for beach access across the US.

“Vinod Khosla, with his billions of dollars, bought this piece of property and said, ‘No, no, the public isn’t going to use this anymore. End of story,’” the Surfrider attorney Joe Cotchett said by phone on Thursday. “He got away with it for many years … This is probably one of the most important public right-of-access cases in the country.”

Khosla’s refusal to restore access has made him something of a symbol of the immense wealth in the tech industry and rising income inequality in the region.

Last year, his attorneys claimed that he would open the gate to the beach only if the government paid him $30m, an amount that state officials said was unreasonably high. In October, Khosla also sued two state agencies, accusing the government of using “coercion and harassment” to infringe on his private property rights.

The California coastal commission, established by voters in 1972 to protect public use of the coast, has reported that beachgoers have increasingly complained about private security guards telling them they are trespassing on private property and forcing them to leave the public beaches.

“The issue here is, can wealthy private individuals buy up our beautiful beaches for their own use?” said Cotchett, adding that he expects Khosla to appeal the decision and attempt to bring the case to the US supreme court.

Khosla’s attorney did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Khosla recently made headlines when he downplayed the problem of sexual harassment in the venture capital industry, which has recently been exposed as a major concern among female founders. “I did not know that there was any discrimination,” Khosla said at a recent event, adding that it was “rarer than in most other businesses”.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/aug/10/martins-beach-california-public-vinod-khosla

 

Racist Rob: “I don’t have anything against the Indians”…..“I don’t get it,”….NO SHIT

Trump protege Robin Percival Arkley

WannbeKing Rob would be such a good steward of the land.  Just look how well he’s done with his other properties, like the balloon tract in Old Town or the “dog ranch” in Somoa and several others that don’t have nicknames.   If you look past the repeated arson, crossbow murder, robberies, drug use and transient encampments it’s almost as if the areas are pristine!!!!  Imagine what he could do with the ancient village Tuluwat??? (gasp)

Rob Arkley said he doesn’t understand why there’s been so much backlash against his proposal to buy Indian Island from the city of Eureka instead of allowing the property to transfer to the Wiyot Tribe.

“I am stunned by this whole thing. I don’t get it,” he said, when reached by phone Tuesday at his Security National office in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Arkley said in the wake of his proposal, first made public during a morning talk radio spot on July 31, he, his family and his business have received threats.

“I don’t have anything against the Indians, the issue is access for the people and fair price,” he said.

Arkley said he’s mainly concerned about what public access to the island will be like if the land transfer goes through and about Eureka giving away valuable land when the city faces “limitless financial issues.”

“I want to know why they’re declaring it surplus land to begin with,” he said.

Indian Island, which the Wiyot people call Tuluwat, is the location of the ancient villages Tuluwat and Etpidolh. For generations, the yearly World Renewal Ceremony was held on the island until the massacre of Wiyot men, women, elders and children in 1860. The ceremony was held on the island again in 2014 after a 154-year hiatus.

“This is absolutely the equivalent of paying reparations, which is foolish,” Arkley said about the transfer.

He disagreed when asked if giving the island back would help right a historical wrong, calling it a “bogus argument.”

Since 2000 the tribe has been buying back private parcels of the island and in 2004 the city of Eureka transferred about 45 acres of the island to the tribe. In June, the Eureka City Council committed to moving forward negotiating an agreement to transfer the remaining 200 acres of land the city owns on the island to the Wiyot Tribe.

City manager Greg Sparks previously said the land is appraised at $200,000 and that the council hasn’t discussed Arkley’s offer.

“They’re talking about giving it away, you’ve got to be kidding me!” Arkley said. “That’s why I offered $500,000.”

He said that if his offer is taken up he will set up a charity, similar to how Friends of the Dunes operates, to provide stewardship to the land. Arkley also said it will remain open for public use like it is today. He said he doubted that the tribe would keep the island for public use outside of tribal members and that the tribe hasn’t conducted as much environmental and habitat restoration as they say.

“They’ve done a fraction of what they said they would do,” Arkley said.

According to the tribe’s website, over 60 tons of scrap metal and additional tons of garbage has been removed from the island, a brownsfield assessment and remediation plan was completed, erosion control was implemented and native plants have been planted.

“The tribe has invested more than $3 million in the direct cleanup and restoration project,” Wiyot tribal administrator Michelle Vassel wrote in an email to the Times-Standard on Wednesday. “That number does not include the blood, sweat and tears of countless volunteers who have lent their hands to the project, and the countless hours of fundraisers, grant writing and administrative work managing the project.”

She said the tribe’s plan for the island has remained the same over the past 50 years.

“This includes clean up of environmental hazards, restoration of wildlife habitat. It also includes protection of grave sites, cultural resources, return of ceremony and living Wiyot cultural practices to the Island,” Vassel wrote.

She added that is not about exclusionary practices.

“The Wiyot Tribe is a government which by nature is a public not private entity,” she wrote. “The tribe has no intention of excluding people, we have worked long and hard with the city of Eureka and other government agencies local native and non-native, people and organizations in this community to come together to work toward these goals.”

Vassel asserts that what the tribe is doing benefits everyone.

“The work the tribe has done and plans to do on the island benefits the whole community,” she wrote. “In ceremony, we do not pray only for Wiyot people we pay for all people, really the whole world.”

Times standard

http://www.times-standard.com/general-news/20170809/arkley-responds-to-backlash-over-offer-to-buy-indian-island

F–k Rob Arkley!

“Our own local racist bully boy version of Trump doesn’t want the Wiyot’s stolen home returned to them.”TE

Tuluwat Village

Allen McCloskey sets the record straight:

Indian Island is and always has been of great cultural and historical value to the Wiyot People. I support the City of Eureka City Council (Austin Allison and Kim Walford-Bergel) and City Leadership in their efforts to restore Indian Island to its original inhabitants/stewards. The Wiyot People as the original inhabitants and stewards of Indian Island have what I equate to a genetic-historical-connection to Indian Island. The cultural connection of the Tribe to Indian Island goes back countless generations and their people are intrinsically tied to the Island. In fact I would argue that their individual and collective well-being and prosperity and the healing of the Tribe’s genetic memory with regards to the historical trauma and deliberate attack by Eureka’s great businessmen of the time, to commit genocide of the Wiyot people, is truly contingent upon the environmental health and return of this land to its original inhabitants/stewards.

The Tribe and the City of Eureka in recent years have worked together collectively to mitigate years of pollution and contamination and have engaged in meaningful dialogue with regards to transitioning Indian Island back to the Tribe. The collective work of the Tribe and the City should not be tarnished and/or in any way delayed or derailed by the intentional and ignorant intervention by the likes of Robin Arkely, merely on the premise that he feels that the Island belongs to him and his family, because, in his words they “like it.” Indian Island was stolen from the Wiyot people at the hands of “prominent Eureka businessmen” of that time who murdered and viciously killed the Wiyot people.

The current City leadership is now in the process of contributing to the healing of the Wiyot people by returning the Island to its original inhabitants. The City’s efforts to return the Island to the Wiyot people is clearly an act of restoring to the indigenous peoples what very obviously they’re entitled to and they have a legitimate claim to, and a claim I might add that on the Tribe’s part is in no way divisive but rather restorative. That’s the idea behind reconciliation. I commend the City of Eureka Council for their recent actions and their commitment to the Wiyot People and the return of Indian Island.

In Solidarity,

Allen McCloskey

 

Homeless numbers down 43% (wtf?) and more locally spun “alternative facts”

In 2015 we posted a number of stories about the attempts to down play the seriousness of the homeless crisis in Eureka. Particularly, we tried to emphasize “who benefits from the systematic under count of homeless/houseless”.
Check out what we said back then and read today’s story in the Times-Standard and other sources we included.
Despite what you can see with your own eyes, you’re supposed to believe that homelessness is dramatically down in Humboldt?
Shake your head laughable!

https://tuluwatexaminer.wordpress.com/2015/02/02/who-benefits-from-the-systematic-under-count-of-the-houseless/

https://tuluwatexaminer.wordpress.com/2015/07/25/eureka-declares-victory-over-homelessness/

https://tuluwatexaminer.wordpress.com/2016/09/13/housing-plan-will-never-amount-to-more-than-a-piss-into-the-ocean/

https://tuluwatexaminer.wordpress.com/2015/04/27/crime-the-homeless-and-the-andrew-mills-conundrum/

 

Times-Standard story: Homeless survey scrutinized

County, organizations state lack of volunteers, housing efforts led to lower count

Humboldt County has seen a large reduction in its homeless population, according to preliminary data released this week, with county officials attributing the drop to collaborative rehousing efforts, but also a reduction in volunteers who participated in the survey.

“We know this isn’t a scientifically accurate count of every homeless person in the county. It’s never been intended to be,” Humboldt County Housing Coalition co-Chairwoman and county Department of Health and Human Services Senior Program Manager Sally Hewitt said Friday. “It gives us a brief picture of a point in time with what is going on in our homeless population.”

This year’s Point-in-Time survey counted 668 homeless individuals on Feb. 28 compared to the 1,180 in the last count in 2015 and the 864 in 2013. The survey is conducted on a single day every two years and is a requirement to receive funding from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Hewitt said part of the reduction is due to 217 chronically homeless individuals having found permanent housing since Eureka and the county began implementing a Housing First approach to homelessness in early 2016 with the help of local landlords. Hewitt said the preliminary data also showed the number of homeless families have continued to decline as they had in the previous three counts.

However, this year’s count did not include any of the homeless population in the Garberville area after a group of regular survey volunteers refused to participate based on concerns that the funding was not helping the southern Humboldt County homeless population.

Debra Carey, vice president of Affordable Homeless Housing Alternatives, or AHHA, said she had been one of the volunteers who coordinated the Garberville-area county for several years. But this year, Carey said she felt that the county lacked the necessary preparation. She said she and many of the homeless individuals she had spoken to had become disgruntled that the government funding that these counts were supposed to generate were not reaching their community.

“What is this count all about if it’s not about getting the numbers to get the funds to assist this group of people?” Carey said.

Hewitt said the Department of Housing and Urban Development requires counties to deliver their counts in order to access funding available through Continuums of Care, like the county’s housing coalition. The coalition formed in 2004 and is composed of local government agencies and other entities that seek to reduce homelessness.

The amount of federal funding a community receives is not determined by the number of homeless individuals counted, but rather by “an extremely complicated process” involving reviewing data of available jobs and population sizes, according to Hewitt. However, Hewitt said the Point-in-Time count can be used by organizations to try and leverage funding from the state.

As to why southern Humboldt County communities are not receiving the federal funding, Hewitt said that the funding is only available for ongoing programs such as Redwood Community Action Agency, Arcata House Partnership, the county and Humboldt Bay Housing. The majority of the federal funding must be used for subsidizing rent and only a small portion can be used for administrative costs, which Hewitt said can be a limiting factor for small grassroots organizations.

“If there was a group in some of the outlying areas that had the infrastructure to handle the amount of funding, it would be wonderful for them to apply,” Hewitt said.

Hewitt said that county volunteers did attempt to survey Garberville homeless residents, but said that none were willing to be surveyed.

AHHA President Nezzie Wade did participate in this year’s count in Eureka, but said she did so not in her capacity with her organization. Like Carey, Wade said she felt that the federal funds were only being used to help a small number of people in the homeless communities. She and Carey also expressed concerns about the size of the survey and the lack of planning by the coalition for this year’s count, which is why AHHA did not associate itself with it.

“The month before it was supposed to happen, they started talking about it,” Wade said of the count. “… We talked about it and said this is not an organized effort. This is not something we would not want to subscribe to.” Hewitt said that AHHA’s concerns were valid, but that they did not tell the full story.

She said they had been planning this count a year earlier and were planning to use a new approach. Rather than having every homeless individual take surveys in order to be counted, Hewitt said they were planning on doing a head count and then scientifically selecting a sample of the homeless population to take the survey. They would then apply that data to entire homeless population. The coalition was proceeding with this plan until the last two months of 2016 when the Housing and Urban Development Department told them that they could not use that method, Hewitt said.

The department gave them the options of doing the count as they had in years past or doing an observation count. The latter option would take place from 8 p.m. to 7 a.m. in January and would involve volunteers counting homeless individuals as they sleep.

“Well, in a city where they tend to sleep out in the open, it’s relatively easy to count people,” Hewitt said. “If you’re talking about going into the woods in Humboldt County in the dark and wandering around with a flashlight and trying to get homeless people awake enough to see how many there are in their tent or having to open their tent flaps to count them, it just got more and more ridiculous.”

After back and forth disputes, Hewitt said the coalition decided in January to perform the count as they had done since 2009.

“We were scrambling and we were looking for every volunteer we could,” Hewitt said. “I’m glad some of [the AHHA members] decided to participate because we count on them.”

Hewitt said more than 100 volunteers participated, with about 80 acting as surveyors.

Wade also stated that police enforcement on homeless individuals may have led to reduced numbers in this year’s report. Wade said she had contacted many of the homeless individuals living along Broadway in Eureka and nearby cross streets to let them know about the count. But Wade said these streets were near empty by the time they surveyed the area on Feb. 28, and said that many of the homeless were told by police that they could not stay there for the next three days.

“That was quite a coincidence,” Wade said.

Eureka Police Department Public Information Officer Brittany Powell said that Chief Andrew Mills had heard from the county that there was a rumor that a law enforcement agency — but not the EPD — had cleared out the homeless individuals.(sounds like a Mills tactic to the Examiner)

“We have not heard anything more about this and there is nothing to substantiate the allegation,” Powell wrote in an email to the Times-Standard. “EPD and the (Mobile Intervention & Services Team) assisted in the Point-in-Time count prior to the actual count by providing training, resources, and identifying locations to check.”

http://www.times-standard.com/general-news/20170519/humboldt-county-homeless-survey-scrutinized

more local spin:

https://www.northcoastjournal.com/NewsBlog/archives/2017/05/19/no-homeless-people-in-southern-humboldt

http://kiem-tv.com/video/annual-homeless-count-decreases

https://lostcoastoutpost.com/2017/may/18/humboldts-homeless-numbers-down-43-percent-two-yea/

 

Dutch TV documentary links Traitor Trump to criminal racketeering

There is a Dutch TV documentary alleges that Donald Trump has extensive connections to Russia’s ruling oligarchs and a history of illegal racketeering.

No wonder why he won’t release his taxes or financial information

“Donald Trump’s business partners have included Russian oligarchs and convicted mobsters, which could make the president guilty of criminal racketeering charges,” wrote Steven Rosenfeld at AlterNet on Friday.

He continued, “That’s only one of the eyebrow-raising takeaways from a 45-minute Dutch documentary that first aired last week, ‘The Dubious Friends of Donald Trump, Part 1: The Russians.’”

The 45-minute documentary was produced by Zembla TV (an investigative series from the VARA Broadcasting Association, is a Dutch public broadcasting association that operates within the framework of the Netherlands Public Broadcasting system) They examine Trump’s alleged relationship with Russian mobster Felix Sater — which Trump reportedly took pains to hide from regulators.

It also looks at Trump’s arrangements with wealthy Russians that apparently allow them to move their money outside Russia and details the elaborate financial networks these families use as a “pyramid scheme for money laundering,” Rosenfeld said. “The financial trail exposed raises questions about whether Trump fired FBI Director James Comey because the FBI’s investigation of his campaign’s collusion with Russia was encroaching into Trump’s world of dark money and dubious business partners.”

Zembla promoted the documentary by saying, “For months, the FBI have been investigating Russian interference in the American presidential elections. ZEMBLA is investigating another explosive dossier concerning Trump’s involvement with the Russians: Trump’s business and personal ties to oligarchs from the former Soviet Union. Powerful billionaires suspected of money laundering and fraud, and of having contacts in Moscow and with the mafia. What do these relationships say about Trump and why does he deny them? How compromising are these dubious business relationships for the 45th president of the United States? And are there connections with the Netherlands? ZEMBLA meets with one of Trump’s controversial cronies and speaks with a former CIA agent, fraud investigators, attorneys, and an American senator among others.”

Zembla has also released Part Two of the series, “The King of Diamonds,” which explores Trump’s relationship with Israeli billionaire Lev Leviev, who is suspected of trading in blood diamonds.

Watch the English language version of “The Dubious Friends of Donald Trump,” embedded below: